Monday, December 17, 2007

And one more patch

RUMI: On a Sunday radio program, "Speaking of Faith," Krista Tippet talked with Fatemeh Keshavarz, a professor and Rumi translator about the Persian poet Rumi. I have read Rumi's poetry. I own a book called "The Essential Rumi" translated by Colman Barks who's translations through the years have made Rumi very popular in the US. You can listen to the program or read about it here.

4 comments:

Lynn said...

I will give this some attention soon.

Thanks Suki, for all your input on my blog about my work and family history. It's all so helpful and pleasing to read. I do prompt you to sit with your mom and those photos and get the names and places down, or you, like me, shall regret it later.

human being said...

Rumi has got two big books: one is his love poems (Ghazaliat e Shams) , and the other is poems that tell stories of different kinds but with a mystical undertone (Massnavi e Ma'navi)... This book you have, should be the former,isn't it?
Very interesting you have read Rumi and love his work.
In Iran we usually call him Molana or Molavi.

sukipoet said...

Lynn, I know i should do what you say but all the albums are in my storage unit! Yikes.

human being, the book I have has a mix of both the Ghazaliat e Shams and the Massnavi. I know the woman i heard on the radio had some reservations about Colman Bark's translations and arrangements. But he has popularized Rumi in this country by his translations. I have seen other books (also by Colman Barks , tran.) that are of just the love poems.

I also have read but no long own a book of Nasruddin tales which I love. The one most popularly told here is about Nasruddin searching under a street light for a key and a man asks him can he help search. Oh yes,Nasruddin says. Where did you drop it the man asks. Over there and Nasruddin points across the street to where it is dark. Why are you looking here if you dropped the key over there, the man asks.
Because the light is here, Nasruddin says.

sukipoet said...

thanks for the affectional name for Rumi.